Small Arms Fire

by Fitzroy on November 23, 2008

Happy Victory in Iraq Day. In case you missed it.

Ten Politically Incorrect Propositions. It’s difficult to choose just one for an excerpt because Victor Davis Hanson puts a lot of meat on the table with this article. Number 6, however, is particularly interesting:

Something has happened to the generic American male accent. Maybe it is urbanization; perhaps it is now an affectation to sound precise and caring with a patina of intellectual authority; perhaps it is the fashion culture of the metrosexual; maybe it is the influence of the gay community in arts and popular culture. Maybe the ubiquitous new intonation comes from the scarcity of salty old jobs in construction, farming, or fishing. But increasingly to meet a young American male about 25 is to hear a particular nasal stress, a much higher tone than one heard 40 years ago, and, to be frank, to listen to a precious voice often nearly indistinguishable from the female. How indeed could one make Westerns these days, when there simply is not anyone left who sounds like John Wayne, Richard Boone, Robert Duvall, or Gary Cooper much less a Struther Martin, Jack Palance, L.Q. Jones, or Ben Johnson? I watched the movie Twelve O’clock High the other day, and Gregory Peck and Dean Jagger sounded liked they were from another planet. I confess over the last year, I have been interviewed a half-dozen times on the phone, and had no idea at first whether a male or female was asking the questions. All this sounds absurd, but I think upon reflection readers my age (55) will attest they have had the same experience. In the old days, I remember only that I first heard a variant of this accent with the old Paul Lynde character actor in one of the Flubber movies; now young men sound closer to his camp than to a Jack Palance or Alan Ladd.

Candy Asses. That’s Ann Althouse’s description of the anti Sarah Palin crowd hyperventilating over a dead turkey, and I can’t think of a better one. I guess the 52 percent will be eating bean sprouts for Thanksgiving.

Lesson for Candy Asses: “When tillage begins, other arts follow. The farmers, therefore, are the founders of human civilization.” – Daniel Webster

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